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Losing customers without any plan to mitigate the situation is a surefire path to ensure your business goes under. If you’re seeing a decline in customers, there could be various reasons for why that’s the case, like poor customer service, inconsistent pricing, or lack of training for your sales reps.

Digging into why you’re losing customers doesn’t need to be a big mystery to solve. However, understanding why you might be losing customers is essential so you can create and implement a plan to recover and retain your clients.

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Let’s look at a few possible reasons you might be losing customers.

9 Reasons You’re Losing Customers

How to Turn Your Strategy Around. Analyze customer behavior. Propose solutions and offer support. Quickly respond to customers. Ensure your team is on the same page. Treat all customers as a priority.

1. Poor Customer Service

Your organization’s customer service starts from the moment a customer contacts a representative of your company. And the number one reason you might be losing customers is poor customer service.

The best sales representatives understand customer service is more than closing a deal.

Excellent customer service involves building relationships with clients and connecting with them personally. 82% of sales reps agree this is the best part of the job, too.

Once your sales reps establish a genuine connection, they can better understand and serve their clients, offering only the best care and service.

Pro tip: Put yourself in your customers’ shoes and ask yourself: “Would I be satisfied with the level of customer service that I’m receiving from my representatives?” If the answer is “no” or even a meager “maybe,” it’s time to consider how you can boost your customer service game.

2. Confusing Pricing

A second reason you might lose customers is inconsistent pricing. You know the worth of your product and the value it provides for your customers. However, if you do not price it correctly and clearly define your offerings, this can cause confusion for customers. It gives them a reason to walk away from your business.

The best sales reps know to look at their products or services from a customer’s perspective. From a customer standpoint, it makes the most sense to look at options from lowest to highest when it comes to pricing, which is why 84% of SaaS companies price their products from lowest to highest.

Tiered pricing and subscriptions are great pricing models. Still, if you’re not clear on what you are offering, your tiers heavily overlap, or you present the highest option first, you’re potentially misrepresenting the value your product or service offers.

Pro tip: Consider reconsidering your pricing and accurately defining what you’re offering customers to eliminate confusion.

3. Lack of Training

Think like a customer for a second. Have you ever been in a situation where you were ready to make a purchase, but it was clear the sales professional did not understand the product, how it could benefit you, or the art of the sale? For a customer, nothing is worse than dealing with a sales professional who lacks the necessary training.

As a business owner or department manager, you know what it takes to help your sales representatives excel in their jobs: training and sales enablement.

Over half of sales professionals rely on sales enablement content daily. And 79% of those sales pros agree that sales enablement is vital to making a sale. With the proper training and enablement, your sales representatives can provide the utmost customer service for your clients.

Pro tip: Review your sales enablement documents and training plan. This can be the difference between losing clients and retaining them.

4. Over-Promising and Under-Delivering

You probably know the phrase “Honesty is the best policy.” The same concept applies to sales, meaning your sales reps should never hype up a product or service so much that it fails to deliver what is promised.

Over-promising and under-delivering fall flat when it comes to customer satisfaction, which is likely why customers walk away from a brand. The best sales reps understand that a customer’s trust in a brand must be protected. Once the trust is gone, it is hard to gain it back.

Pro tip: When training your sales reps, ensure they understand the key aspects of your product or service to help them better convey the product or service’s promise.

5. Underrepresenting Your Product or Service

Just like overpromising a product or service’s value, underrepresenting it can cause a loss of customers. With the internet at their fingertips, 96% of customers research a product or service before speaking with a sales professional.

This means your customer likely already has a good understanding of what your product or service offers. What they might need help understanding, though, is how the product or service can benefit them directly.

There is a reason great sales professionals spend time connecting with their customers. This time is spent understanding their customers’ specific pain points. Because customers have already researched the product or service, a salesperson’s time with a customer is better spent explaining how the product or service can benefit them than explaining the product’s features.

Pro tip: Encourage your sales teams to talk with customers about their pain points. This will illuminate new ways your product or service can help them.

6. Slow Response Times

With 65% of revenue coming from existing customers, an organization should consider ways to maintain those customer relationships. Putting customers on hold or slowly responding to their queries and emails is not a suitable retention method and can be why your company is losing customers.

It’s no secret that sales professionals are busy people who have more on their plate than just sales. Data shows only two hours of a sales rep’s day is spent on sales, which is why more and more star sales reps are turning to AI tools to help them automate specific time-consuming tasks.

With the time saved with AI automation, those sales reps are free for other things, like responding to customers and helping solve issues.

Pro tip: Use AI tools like HubSpot AI to automate tasks and enable your reps to work on other customer-facing tasks.

7. Lack of Personalization

Do you know the warm and fuzzy feeling you get when someone says your name? That’s the feeling you should give your customers to let them know you and your team care.

Impersonal interactions between a customer and sales rep often feel cold and leave the customer feeling as if they are not important. For those customers, it’s easy to leave one brand behind for another who has taken the time to personalize the customer experience.

Personalizing a customer’s experience with your brand doesn’t have to be complicated. 66% of sales professionals use AI tools to help personalize every step of the sales process for their customers.

Good sales professionals also know that customers love to hear their name and will actively say it during conversations with clients.

Pro tip: The more your sales reps can personalize the sales process, the better.

8. Resistance to Change

With the introduction of AI, there is no denying that industries are constantly changing. And that includes the sales industry, too. These rapid changes demand sales professionals be flexible and open to change, even if it requires throwing out what they’ve always done to close a deal.

Being resistant to change means you are closing a door to potential sales and likely not meeting the needs of your current customer base. Good sales reps understand that to retain customers successfully, they must adapt to the times and keep up with trends.

Pro tip: Keep an eye on your and your customers’ industry to stay up-to-date with new trends.

9. Being a Product, Not a Partner

Are your sales reps selling a product or a partnership? The immediate answer might be “a product” because that’s precisely what your organization sells. However, positioning your brand as just a product might be where you lose customers.

Customers don’t want just another product. They want to be confident in their purchase and know that if they need help, your brand is in their corner. The best sales reps understand they are not just selling a product or service.

Instead, they are forging a partnership with the client and your brand. And the most successful sales professionals use collaborative words, like “we” and “us,” to help promote and maintain partnerships with the customer.

Pro tip: Train your sales professionals to use collaborative words, like “we” and “us,” to help promote partnership.

How to Turn Your Strategy Around

If your company is losing customers, don’t fret. Although losing a customer is not fun, use it as a learning opportunity to improve your business operations. There are several things you can do to bring your customers back and increase customer retention.

Use these tips from experienced customer service professionals to create a plan to regain your clients.

1. Analyze customer behavior.

If you notice that you’re losing customers, it can be difficult to pinpoint exactly why that is the case. Sure, there are reasons like those listed above, but you won’t know until you ask your customers.

As a customer service coordinator, Jackie Ryan suggests “conducting customer feedback surveys and interviews and analyzing customer behavior to better understand why they are leaving.”

Asking for meaningful feedback through a survey is a great way to gather customer retention metrics to help you better understand a customer’s decision to stay with or leave your brand.

Survey responses can highlight areas you and your team can improve to help mitigate customer loss and improve retention. Make sure to ask appropriate questions and provide your clients with the opportunity for open-ended discussions.

2. Propose solutions and offer support.

Customers need to know they’re not just another number for your organization’s bottom line. However, they’ll feel like “another number” if your team does not offer personalized support and solutions when they experience an issue.

Gene Caballero, co-founder of GreenPal, says, “It’s not just about fixing the issue, but also offering support and reassurance. In my experience, personalized solutions greatly enhance customer satisfaction.”

If you’re able to see the breakdown in a customer relationship before it completely crumbles, you and your team should propose personalized solutions to fix the issue and offer your customer support to bring them back to your brand.

3. Quickly respond to customers.

One of the reasons you might lose customers is a delayed response time. An obvious strategy to fix this issue is to make it a priority to respond to customers quickly.

Joel Wolfe, president and founder of HiredSupport.com, says, “Customers value being heard, and part of being heard is being heard right now. And not being heard tomorrow or two days from when the initial complaint was made. That further deteriorates the customer relationship you’re trying to salvage.”

The longer you and your team wait to respond to their queries, the higher the chance a customer will be unsatisfied with your company.

4. Ensure your team is on the same page.

Remember how we mentioned that overpromising and underrepresenting your product or service are two reasons you might lose customers? There is a way to mitigate those issues to keep your clients with your company, and that is to ensure that every member of your company, whether that’s customer success or your receptionists, is on the same page.

Mike Bonventre, an entrepreneur and business consultant, suggests that customers leave a company because “the employees that are doing the job are not in sync with sales.”

In other words, your customers receive conflicting information from one department to another. This leaves the door open for overpromising or underrepresenting your product or service.

You can mitigate this by training your departments on the features and benefits of your product or service so that only accurate information is passed on to your clients.

5. Treat all customers as a priority.

This goes without saying, but your customers are your most important priority. Without customers, your business is sure to go under. However, one way to retain your customer base is to make your customers feel like they are your and your team’s top priorities.

Mike Bonventre says, “Forget about the money. Every minute you are thinking about money, you’re not thinking about providing customer service. Remember your priority.”

Mike’s suggestion might seem to go against the grain, but when your customers are your first priority, you can be sure you’re providing them with the best customer service possible. Customers who are satisfied with your customer service are likely to stay with your business.

Plus, happy customers are also more likely to tell others about your brand.

It’s important to take the time to understand why your customers are leaving and what you can do as a team to bring them back. To learn more about customer retention and strategies you can implement today, check out our free library of customer retention resources.

Implementing a Retention Strategy to Stop Churn

Losing customers can feel as if it’s the end for your business. While losing clients certainty impacts your revenue, it doesn’t have to be the end for your company. With the right strategy in place, you can recover from it.

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Have you ever received a message from a friend or family member and couldn’t tell if they were joking or not? If so, you’re not alone — and that’s exactly why sentiment analyzers are helpful. Businesses constantly experience this challenge on a large scale. When communicating with customers in a non-face-to-face setting, it can be tricky — or downright impossible — to determine the tone of the message. That’s where sentiment analysis comes into the picture. 

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In this post, we’ll explain what a sentiment analysis tool is and provide a list of the best options available for your team this year.

what is sentiment analysis: definition

Benefits of Adopting a Sentiment Analysis Tool

Want to dive deeper into the benefits of utilizing a sentiment analyzer? I’ll walk you through the five most critical reasons brands consider sentiment analysis worthwhile. 

1. Streamlined Feedback Management

If your company provides an omnichannel experience, a sentiment analysis tool can save your team valuable time organizing and reporting customer feedback. With the help of a sentiment analyzer, your team won’t have to spend time tracking down feedback. Instead, it will be aggregated in one easy-to-access place. 

2. Better Problem Resolution

Automating the process of analyzing customer feedback enables your customer service teams to respond more effectively to your customers.

Rather than going through each tweet and comment one by one, a sentiment analysis tool processes your feedback and automatically interprets whether it’s positive, negative, or neutral. This will allow you to proactively address issues before they escalate, improving the overall customer experience.

3. Improved Product and Service Quality

Gaining insights into customer sentiments and pain points allows you to adjust your products and services. This will enable you to enhance quality and meet your customer expectations. For instance, if your sentiment analysis tool repeatedly tags mentions of the same issue, you know it’s worth digging into deeper. Without the assistance of the sentiment analyzer, you wouldn’t be able to put the puzzle pieces together as quickly as you can with it. 

4. Informed Business Decisions

Many sentiment analysis tools combine your data and display it in charts or graphs that clearly outline trends in your customer response. These insights enable you to make informed business decisions to boost customer satisfaction. Without sentiment analysis, it would be difficult to identify trends in your customer feedback — which is a large reason why using a tool is so important. 

5. Real-Time Feedback Analysis

Sentiment analysis tools offer the ability to analyze customer feedback in real time, allowing immediate action and response to customer sentiments. You don’t have to wait days or weeks to determine what customers are saying about your business — you can access this information right away. 

Now that you know what a sentiment analysis tool is and how it can benefit your business, let’s look at some of the best tools available in 2024. 

1. HubSpot’s Service Hub

sentiment analyzer: hubspot's service hub

HubSpot’s customer feedback tool

HubSpot’s Service Hub includes a customer feedback tool to break down qualitative survey responses and evaluate them for positive or negative intent. It uses NPS® surveys to clarify whether a customer’s review was good or bad and organizes them based on sentiment. 

Users can analyze the results by looking at one comprehensive dashboard that includes charts and graphs that provide an overview of customer satisfaction.

HubSpot’s Service Hub suite can also analyze customers on an individual basis. You can integrate your CRM with Service Hub and review survey responses from specific contacts in your database. That way, your team can quickly identify customers who are unhappy and follow up with them after they’ve had a negative experience with your brand.

What makes HubSpot’s Service Hub stand out is its seamless integration with other HubSpot modules and over 1,500 leading apps and web services. This ensures that your customer service teams have all the necessary data at their fingertips to conduct in-depth sentiment analysis and make informed decisions.

Remember, 59% of US consumers will walk away from a business after several bad experiences — and 17% will walk away after they’ve had just one unsatisfactory experience, according to PwC. This gives your team an opportunity to intercept unhappy customers and prevent potential churn.

What we love: HubSpot’s Service Hub offers tailored onboarding and free online training. With guidance from certified solutions partners or dedicated onboarding specialists, navigating the tool becomes seamless for your service team. 

Price: $20/month for a CRM Suite starter plan, $18/month for a Starter Plan, and $450/month for a Professional plan. (You can also get started with some of our tools for free.) 

2. Idiomatic

sentiment analyzer: idiomatic

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Idiomatic builds customer sentiment analysis models based on your specific business. Idiomatic’s sentiment labels are calibrated to the specific channels of your customer feedback.

For each data source (app reviews, support tickets, etc.), Idiomatic has different sentiment analysis models. As a result, you can track more accurate sentiments by channel.

With Idiomatic, you can also track changes in sentiment by channel and customer segments over time. As a result, you can evaluate channel and customer segment performance and improve issues causing frustration and negative sentiment.

What sets Idiomatic apart is its custom data labels, organized into easy-to-understand categories and issues. This innovative feature bridges the gap between the language of your customers and the way your business describes issues. 

By creating a comprehensive and custom set of labels for each of your unique data sets, Idiomatic can surface trends that may have previously gone unnoticed. This results in unified and up-to-date insights on an ongoing basis, allowing you to stay ahead of customer needs and expectations.

What we love: Idiomatic leverages AI to ensure that the insights derived are both accurate and reliable. This helps you unlock the “why” behind customer feedback, offering a complete, data-driven voice of the customer.

Price: $399 a month for a simple data sources plan; $1,999 a month for a complex data sources plan.

3. Talkwalker

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Talkwalker’s “Quick Search” is a sentiment analysis tool that’s part of a larger customer service platform. This tool works best with your social media channels because it can tell you exactly how people feel about your company’s social media accounts.

Quick Search looks at your mentions, comments, engagements, and other data to provide your team with an extensive breakdown of how customers respond to your social media activity. This helps your team plan and produce effective campaigns that captivate your target audience.

What makes this tool highly effective is its aspect-based sentiment analysis. This feature provides granular insights into customer feedback by focusing on specific elements influencing opinions and satisfaction. 

It enables your business to pinpoint exact areas of contentment or discontent, allowing for targeted improvements in products or services. 

What we love: Talkwalker analyzes support tickets and emails, helping you identify common customer issues and concerns. This feature is useful in refining customer support processes and aligning products & services closely with customer expectations.

Price: Talkware offers a listen plan, analyze plan, business plan, and premium plan. Pricing for all plans is available upon request.

4. Reputation

reputation: sentiment analyzer

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Powered by NLP (Natural Language Processing), the Reputation platform breaks down customer sentiment and analyzes feedback to highlight trends and topics in real time.

Their advanced text analytics determine what people are commenting on and whether the comments are positive or negative. This allows users to surface customer pain points across multiple digital channels or locations.

Reputation’s real-time alerts & mentions feature enables you to set alerts for mentions of your brand and trending keywords. The feature helps manage customer communications and address potential crises. This ensures your business maintains a positive relationship with your customers and swiftly responds to their needs.

What we love: Reputation offers real-time sentiment analysis reports that allow you to analyze customer sentiment minute-by-minute. This feature is crucial for measuring experiences and making immediate improvements for better customer satisfaction.

Price: Available upon request.

5. Repustate

sentiment analyzer: repustate

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Repustate has a sophisticated text-analysis API that accurately assesses the sentiment behind customer responses. Its software can pick up on short-form text and slang like lol, rofl, and smh. It also analyzes emojis and determines their intention within the context of a message.

For example, if I use a 😉 emoji, Repustate tells you if that’s a positive or negative symbol based on what it finds in the rest of the conversation.

Repustate also lets you customize your API’s rules to have it filter for language that may be specific to your industry.

If there’s slang or alternate meanings for words, you can program those subtleties into Repustate’s system. This way, you have full control over how the software analyzes your customers’ feedback.

Additionally, Repustate uses sentiment analysis to identify what is working well in your customer service and what requires improvement. It achieves this by classifying customer feedback into various categories, such as pricing, service, location, and ease of use, providing a complete overview of customer satisfaction.

What we love: Repustate’s multilingual sentiment analysis supports over 20 languages. It breaks down language barriers and provides actionable insights from diverse customer feedback. This feature significantly enhances customer service by enabling you to understand and engage effectively with a global customer base.

Price: $199 a month for standard plan; $499 a month for a premium plan.

6. Brand24

Brand24: sentiment analyzer

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Brand24 is a media monitoring tool that automatically performs sentiment analysis around your brand or any topic related to your business.

It collects publicly available mentions from the Internet, including social media, blogs, forums, websites, news sites, customer reviews, videos, podcasts, and other places.

Brand24 uses advanced machine learning algorithms and NLP techniques that analyze the text in real-time and assign the appropriate sentiment based on the words used.

With sentiment analysis, you can quickly check which mentions are positive, negative, or neutral. Their robust analytics allow you to see how often people talk about your brand and competitors, social media reach, top influencers, and more.

What makes Brand24 exceptional is its ability to let businesses discover real-time discussions about their brand. This feature facilitates immediate engagement in relevant conversations with just a single click. This ensures that any arising issues are addressed quickly, thus enhancing customer satisfaction.

What we love: Brand24’s alert system notifies your business of significant shifts in discussion volume or brand-specific mentions. This approach enables you to swiftly respond to changes, especially negative mentions from high-traffic profiles, safeguarding your brand’s reputation.

Price: Free 14-day trial, then $99 a month for an individual plan; $179 a month for a team plan; $249 a month for a pro plan; or $499 for an enterprise plan.

7. Meltwater

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Meltwater’s sentiment analysis utilizes advanced natural language processing (NLP) algorithms to evaluate the sentiment expressed in social media posts, articles, and other online content.

The Meltwater offers comprehensive sentiment analysis, providing text processing, lexicon-based analysis, contextual understanding, weighting and scoring, and aggregation & summarization.

There are several advantages to using Meltwater for sentiment analysis: comprehensive data coverage, accurate sentiment interpretation, customizable sentiment analysis, real-time monitoring, comparative analysis, and integrated analytics and reporting.

Additionally, Meltwater’s Consumer Intelligence Suite is designed to assist in understanding what customers really think, want, and need. It applies AI, data science, and market research expertise to a live feed of global data sources, transforming unstructured data into scientific predictions. 

What we love: Meltwater intelligently categorizes and structures customer data using AI. It enhances the accuracy and efficiency of sentiment analysis by eliminating spam and false positives. This feature ensures that the data used for analysis is relevant and reliable, leading to more insightful and dependable results.

Price: Book a demo for pricing.

8. Lexalytics

lexalytics: sentiment analyzer tool

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Lexalytics offers a text analysis tool that explains why a customer is responding to your business in a certain way.

It uses natural language processing to parse the text and then runs a sentiment analysis to determine the intent behind the customer’s message.

Additionally, Lexalytics can extract themes or topics from large volumes of text, allowing you to identify and address specific concerns that customers are discussing. It concludes the process by compiling the information it derives into an easy-to-read and shareable display. 

While most sentiment analysis tools tell you how customers feel, Lexalytics differentiates itself by telling you why customers feel the way they do.

What we love: The Symantria API by Lexalytics can detect customer intentions in the text, such as intent to purchase, intent to leave, or intent to recommend. This insight can help your business predict customer behavior and take measures to enhance customer satisfaction.

Price: Pricing available on request.

9. SentiSum

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SentiSum can be used to centralize all your voice of customer insights and make them available to wider teams in the company.

Integrating directly with leading support platforms like Zendesk, Dixa, HubSpot, and Intercom, SentiSum’s clever AI learns how your customers express themselves to give accurate insights into customer sentiment. It analyzes and tags every customer conversation across various channels like emails, chats, phone calls, surveys, and reviews in over 100 languages, providing valuable insights such as sentiment and the reason for contact.

With a simple one-click integration, SentiSum quickly identifies the top reasons for customer contacts, sentiment, and the true drivers of NPS and CSAT in just a few minutes. By gaining a deeper understanding of customers’ sentiments, you can respond quickly and effectively to their needs, improve their experience, and increase their loyalty.

What we love: SentiSum’s “Dig In” feature, a part of their Generative AI series, allows you to delve deep into your tickets quickly. It extracts valuable insights and summarizes crucial details, such as the causes of issues or what customers love about your product, improving the understanding of customer feedback.

Price: $2000 monthly for a pro plan; book a demo for enterprise plan pricing. 

10. Critical Mention

sentiment analyzer: critical mention

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Critical Mention differs from the other options on this list because it analyzes news and other publications that reference your business. This way, you can see the sentiment behind stories that are rapidly surfacing to the public.

Since news coverage is now a 24/7 affair, it helps to have software that can monitor the internet and alert you to any buzz your business is making.

Critical Mention can even alert you to stories that appear on television. You can search through video files for mentions of your company and easily clip videos to share with other employees.

If your business gets positively mentioned on a live broadcast, quickly access the video segment and share it on your social media channels. This can help you create effective online content that capitalizes on timely marketing opportunities.

One of the impressive features of Critical Mention is that it offers results within 60 seconds and provides real-time notifications about the latest mentions and sentiments, ensuring you are always updated.

What we love: Critical Mention is built on modern cloud technology, offering real-time alerts and in-depth analytics. This provides reliable media monitoring and insights you can trust.

Price: Pricing available on request.

11. Brandwatch

brandwatch: sentiment analyzer

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One of the coolest features of Brandwatch is its “image insights” tool, which can identify images associated with your brand.

For example, say you upload an image of your brand’s logo. Brandwatch surfs the web for images that include that logo. Then, it compiles the images into a list and highlights exactly where your brand’s logo appears.

Additionally, Brandwatch’s software provides interesting insights into each image it finds. This includes metrics like mention volume, aggregate followers, and latest activity. With Brandwatch, your team sees where your brand’s images are appearing and how those images are performing with your target audience. 

Impressively, Brandwatch has invested 17+ years in developing industry-leading AI optimized for analyzing fast-changing, unstructured data. Using this AI technology, Brandwatch can automatically surface insights, discover objects, scenes, actions, and logos in images, and instantly find relevant data on any brand or topic.

What we love: Brandwatch’s Consumer Research provides instant access to the world’s largest archive of consumer opinions. This feature can be very useful in times of planning or crisis, allowing decision-makers to make the right decision based on historical consumer data.

Price: Pricing available upon request.

12. Sentiment Analysis Ticket

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Sentiment Analysis Ticket is a HubSpot integration designed to analyze the sentiment of conversations related to your tickets using AI. 

By intercepting and studying the tone and context of customer request conversations, it offers valuable insights to enhance your customer service. The application is capable of providing real-time sentiment feedback by analyzing the text of emails associated with a ticket in HubSpot. 

What makes this tool effective is its ability to summarize the sentiment of the conversation in the ticket property, indicating whether the message’s sentiment is positive, negative, or neutral. This data can be effectively utilized in your workflows or reports, ensuring a comprehensive understanding of customer interactions.

What we love: Sentiment Analysis Ticket provides real-time insights into what people say about your brand. The platform alerts you of any significant changes in discussion volume or mentions, enabling you to discover and address these changes quickly.

Price: Free plans are available; €9 a month for a starter plan; €29 a month for a pro plan; €49 a month for an ultra plan, €99 a month for an enterprise plan.

13. Social Searcher

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Social Searcher is a social media monitoring platform designed to monitor public mentions across various platforms, including social networks, blogs, forums, news sites, and more. It also includes a free sentiment analysis tool that lets you know whether the buzz surrounding any particular keyword, hashtag, or username is positive or negative.

It also breaks reports down by social media platforms so you can see exactly how your brand performs across different apps and channels.

One of the standout features of Social Searcher is its ability to distill negative feedback from social networks, allowing you to address concerns before they escalate. 

What we love: Social Searcher’s real-time monitoring and immediate email alerts ensure you never miss out on crucial customer feedback. Additionally, its capability to analyze sentiment in multiple languages and across various digital channels makes it an excellent tool for brands aiming to maintain a positive online reputation.

Price: Free to start; €3.49 a month for a basic plan; €8.49 a month for a standard plan; €19.49 a month for a professional plan.

14. Rosette 

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Rosette is a text analytics and discovery platform specializing in processing human language using AI. It is great for international businesses because it can review text-based data in over 30 languages. This means you won’t have to translate conversations before you upload them, which is not only faster but ensures greater accuracy.

Since most customers will use shorthand or slang, third-party translation tools can inadvertently change the meaning of their text.

With Rosette, its system is built to analyze text in the language that it’s written, so you won’t lose any valuable feedback, even if it’s written informally. One of the standout features of Rosette is that you can train Rosette for custom domains (like tech or e-commerce) or additional languages using the Rosette Classification Field Training Kit.

What we love: Rosette’s sentiment analysis capability is trained on tweets and reviews, enabling it to understand strong positive and negative sentiments in a text.

Price: $100 monthly for a starter plan, $400 a month for a medium plan, $1,000 a month for a large plan.

15. MonkeyLearn 

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MonkeyLearn is a sentiment analysis tool that’s easy to customize. All you have to do is create categorization tags and then manually highlight different text parts to show what content belongs to each tag. Over time, the software learns on its own and can process multiple files simultaneously.

MonkeyLearn also provides its customers with a free “Word Cloud” tool that tells them what words are frequently used within each categorization tag. This can help businesses discover common customer roadblocks by looking for repeat mentions of specific products or services.

If you notice one product is consistently listed under a negative categorization tag, this would suggest there’s an issue with that product that customers are unhappy about.

MonkeyLearn stands out with its business templates tailored for various scenarios, equipped with pre-made text analysis models and dashboards. These templates simplify the analytics process, allowing users to upload data, run the analysis, and instantly visualize actionable insights. 

What we love: Leveraging artificial intelligence, MonkeyLearn provides instant data visualizations and detailed insights, enabling you to understand your customer sentiments better. The platform’s ability to connect seamlessly with apps and BI tools through native integrations, SQL connections, or APIs further enhances its utility. 

Price: Starts free, $299 monthly for a team plan, $999 a month for business plans.

Understanding the Voice of Digital Consumer

Understanding customer feedback is more crucial than ever in this digital age. With so many text-based customer interactions flooding your business daily, sentiment analysis tools have become a “must-have” to understand your customers better. These tools not only help decode the tone and intent behind each message but also empower you to tailor your strategies based on genuine customer insights. 

We hope you found this list helpful as you embark on your sentiment analysis journey. Always remember, customer engagement is not just about hearing the words; it’s about understanding their sentiments.

Net Promoter, Net Promoter System, Net Promoter Score, NPS and the NPS-related emoticons are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Inc., Fred Reichheld and Satmetrix Systems, Inc.

Editor’s note: This article was originally published February 2021 and has since been updated for comprehensiveness.

customer service metrics

I take classes at a local Pilates studio at least once a week. After signing up for a class through an app, I get SMS updates communicating class changes and reminders. My favorite kind of text is the one letting me know I’ve been moved off the waitlist and into the class. These real-time updates wouldn’t be possible without customer service texting software.

Customer service texting, or SMS customer service, is an essential part of an omnichannel messaging strategy and an increasingly important element of customer service overall. And when customer service is critical to the rest of the business’s success, SMS software is not something to overlook.

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What is customer service texting software?

Customer service texting software is a program or platform that allows businesses to communicate directly with customers via text messages. Also known as SMS customer service, this form of communication enables businesses to answer customer questions, resolve issues, share appointment reminders, or send order updates in a way that’s convenient for everyone involved.

Including SMS in your customer service strategy — in addition to phone, email, social media, and live chat — allows you to meet customers wherever they are. Taking an omnichannel approach is key to providing good customer service.

Not only does texting provide instant support when customers need it — which can be a fast and convenient way to resolve an issue when they have a question — but it also enables agents to help customers asynchronously. Helping customers over text is much more efficient than talking on the phone, which means agents can handle more tickets in one day. This, combined with the automation that customer service texting software provides, helps your company save time and money. And if you want to learn more about how those intertwine, check out our 2024 State of Customer Service report.

How does customer service texting software work?

Customer service texting software works like other tools in your tech stack. Once you set up a business number or enable texts on your existing one, you can use your software to create and send messages to your contacts. The software can be standalone, or you can choose one that integrates with other tools to create a connected workflow, like the HubSpot’s customer service software.

Most SMS services offer mass texting, two-way conversations, and sometimes MMS (multimedia messaging service), which enables you to send images and GIFs. If you’re focused on using SMS for customer service purposes, the ability to have two-way conversations is the most important feature to look for — especially when you consider that 61% of consumers want the ability to text a business back.

If you have a business landline, you can text-enable your existing number. Or, you can choose a new 10-digit local or 800 number. You can also opt for a five to six-digit short code.

Once you have your SMS number and your software set up, you are ready to start helping customers over text.

10 Best Customer Service Texting Software

I receive texts from businesses all the time, but I never thought about how they could actually text me until I started looking into customer service texting software.

Here are some of the top customer service texting services I found for a range of industries and businesses of all sizes.

1. SimpleTexting

SimpleTexting is a well-rounded customer service texting software that enables businesses to have two-way conversations, as shown in this text exchange between a coffee business and a customer interested in placing a bulk order.

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As its name implies, SimpleTexting makes SMS conversations easy for businesses of all sizes. Whether you want to send product updates or marketing announcements to a list of 500 people or engage in two-way conversations to resolve a customer inquiry, you can do it all in one dashboard.

Some of SimpleTexting’s helpful customer service features include templates for saved replies, self-cleaning lists, link shortening and tracking, and polls. SimpleTexting also makes it easy to launch your texting strategy, even if you’re starting from scratch, by offering multiple options for setting up a number to text from.

What I like: The idea of sending a text to your customers can feel daunting if you haven’t done it before. That’s why I appreciate that SimpleTexting’s free trial allows you to text your own number *first* to see how it all works.

2. Textline

Textline is a customer service texting software for small teams that enables two-way conversations, internal collaboration, and more, all in a unified inbox.

Textline is a popular customer service texting platform that offers secure ways to send bulk SMS, collaborate via group messages, send media attachments, and have two-way conversations. Textline’s pricing plans support anywhere from three to 50 agents, making it a smart SMS software for teams of all sizes.

Plus, Textline integrates with tons of tools that your support team likely already uses, such as HubSpot and Slack, making it easy to create a seamless workflow.

What I like: With Textline, you can send text surveys to directly collect feedback from customers and ultimately improve the customer support process.

3. EZ Texting

Twilio’s SMS API allows businesses to create custom customer service texting software with as little or as much custom code as they want.

EZ Texting is an SMS marketing service used by teams in marketing, sales, operations, and customer service. Plans include unlimited two-way texting and incoming messages, which means you don’t have to worry about missing a customer inquiry.

One of my favorite features of EZ Texting is AI Compose, which uses generative AI to help compose personalized texts for your audience. Using AI to help generate texts is the fastest way to scale your customer service texting operations.

Pro: If you plan to send MMS or multimedia content, you can tap into EZ Texting’s massive library with millions of free images from Shutterstock. There’s even an image editing tool.

4. Twilio

If you’re tech-savvy, consider using Twilio’s SMS API. Geared toward developers, Twilio offers an API that can be used to build your own messaging system, making it a customizable solution.

With Twilio, you can send and receive text messages at scale, and the pricing structure is pay-as-you-go, so you only pay for what you use. This can be a cost-effective way to scale your customer service texting strategy as long as you know how to use the API or have a developer on your team who does.

Best for: Twilio is a developer-friendly SMS tool, so it’s best for those with technical skills.

5. Textedly

Textedly is a customer service texting software geared toward SMS marketing, but it also offers features like two-way texting and keywords that trigger automated responses, as shown here.

Textedly is an SMS marketing service equipped for a range of industries, from retail and restaurants to schools and nonprofit organizations. All of the Textedly plans include unlimited contacts, free incoming messages, picture messaging, one toll-free number, and one 10-digit phone number (10DLC).

While the service is geared toward SMS marketing, Textedly enables businesses to conduct customer service through its two-way texting, personalized messages, and text message analytics. It also helps businesses collect customer feedback by enabling review requests sent through text. This can be a helpful way to automate the process and generate more Google reviews for your business in the process.

Pro: Textedly integrates with over 3,000 apps like HubSpot, Mailchimp, Shopify, and Facebook, so you can connect every tool in your workflow to save time.

6. Heymarket

MessageDesk is a customer service texting software that offers a shared inbox so customer support teams can unify conversations with one phone number in one inbox.

Heymarket is a business texting platform that lets you connect with customers, leads, and employees on SMS and popular messaging apps like Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram.

Some of Heymarket’s most helpful features for customer service include automated texting through keyword-triggered responses and a shared inbox so your support team can tackle multiple ticket requests at one time. Heymarket also offers AI-assisted messaging so you can create responses faster and more efficiently.

What I like: Heymarket’s AI-assisted messaging helps translate messages in English, French, Spanish, and Chinese which enables your support team to help even more people.

7. Textmagic

If you’re looking for an all-in-one business texting solution, Textmagic is another great option. The platform offers two-way texting, mass texts, SMS marketing, and SMS surveys. Plus, it integrates with other support channels so your support team can take an omnichannel approach to customer service.

Textmagic’s pricing structure is a prepaid service. You choose a credit package based on how many texts you plan to use and only pay for texts you send or receive. Add-on features include dedicated virtual numbers, the ability to send MMS, and voice calls.

Pro: In addition to texting, Textmagic makes it easy to use email or voice for customer service interactions so your team can help customers in whatever way is most convenient for them.

8. MessageDesk

MessageDesk is an SMS inbox for business texting. Like other texting platforms, MessageDesk enables you to text-enable your existing business landline or VoIP phone number or sign up for a new local number.

The platform’s main feature is the team inbox. The shared inbox allows your support team to manage conversations together from one phone number, which helps boost visibility and organization across the customer service team.

Con: You have to talk to a member of the sales team to get started, which may deter some people who prefer self-service.

9. Google Voice

Google Voice is a business communications tool that can be a budget-friendly alternative to full-scale customer service texting software.

Looking for a no-frills business texting option? With unlimited texting and plans that start at just $10 per month, Google Voice is a great option for small businesses and individuals who aren’t looking to add another tool to their tech stack.

As part of Google Workspace, Google Voice is an easy way to set up business communications within your current workflow. Voice integrates with Google Meet and Calendar, so all of your business communications are synched. If you’re already familiar with the Google Workspace interface, you’ll have no issues navigating Google Voice.

Best for: Google Voice is an easy, budget-friendly option for small businesses or individuals looking to set up business calling and texting, especially if you already use Google Workspace products.

10. OpenPhone

If you’re looking for a full-scale communication system, OpenPhone is a business phone system that includes texting. Some of OpenPhone’s most helpful features for customer service texting include auto-replies, saved message templates, and internal threads so your customer support team can handle inquiries behind the scenes.

An example of a customer support member following up with a customer service call via text using OpenPhone’s customer service texting software.

All OpenPhone plans include unlimited calling and texting in the US and Canada, and they start at $15 per user per month.

Best for: Businesses who prioritize both calling and texting will benefit from one connected system under OpenPhone.

Use SMS Support to Meet Customers Where They Are

Customer expectations have evolved with the technology that’s available to them. The more time people spend on their phones, the more likely it is that they’ll want to interact with businesses in the same way.

In my experience, the customer service interactions that were the most positive and memorable for me were the ones that were resolved quickly by friendly and supportive customer service agents. I can’t think of a better way to do this than through texting (because, yes, I am a millennial who hates talking on the phone).

Your business needs to be equipped with SMS support to meet customers where they are and address their issues in a way that’s convenient for them. Customer service texting software enables your support team to resolve tickets swiftly and efficiently without spending all of their time on the phone, which benefits everyone involved.

Customer experience (CX) is the impression you leave with your customers, which results in how they think of you as a brand and ultimately creates brand loyalty. And if I know one thing about customer experience it’s this: measuring with customer experience metrics is important if you want to boost customer retention.

Customer experience tracking can help you improve your practices to cater to the entire customer experience. I like to track certain metrics such as how quickly I can solve a customer’s problem. The quicker I can solve a problem, the more likely a client will stick with my business.

As a small business owner, I’ve learned that positive customer experiences can lead to repeat business, and it’s easier and less costly for my business (and yours!) to retain clients than to seek out new customers.

In fact, 49% of customers are likely to leave a company based on a poor customer experience with the brand. So by lowering the customer effort score (CES) by providing simple, easy-to-use products and services means 76% of customers are more likely to recommend my brand to others.

→ Download Now: Customer Service Metrics Calculator [Free Tool]

With that in mind, let’s review the top metrics you can use to measure — and improve — the customer experience.

Jump ahead:

What is customer experience?

Customer experience (CX) is the journey or combination of interactions a customer or potential customer has with a business.

For me, it’s helpful to think that a customer’s experience starts from the very moment a client becomes aware of my business and follows the purchasing process. Plus, CX includes the weeks, months, or even years later that a customer uses my product or service.

If your business is like mine, you probably work hard to get a customer in the door to make a purchase. But, it’s important to look at the whole picture, too. That might mean providing support to your customers, even years down the line.

Why is this extra effort and money worth it to the business? It costs more money to add a new customer than to retain an existing one, and 65% of people say they’d ditch a brand after a poor experience.

Yikes. I don’t know about you, but I don’t want to end up with a negative review that may deter other customers from doing business with me. Negative customer experiences can be costly!

Measuring Customer Experience

Surveys, journey maps, and a variety of other metrics are necessary for measuring CX. If you meticulously track your metrics, this process is complex and can span several years for some customers. But just because it’s complex and time-consuming doesn’t mean you should write it off. You need this data!

I like to think of customer experience as a puzzle. Customer service is just one piece of the puzzle. You want clients to have positive reactions to your advertising and marketing efforts. They should have an easy time using your products or services. And they should get quick responses from your team. Each of these things are pieces that make your customer experience a positive one.

Ways to Measure Customer Experience

I love surveys, and surveys are one of many ways to measure CX. We’ll dive into specific surveys that help measure customer experience in a few, I promise. However, there are tons of ways you can survey your customers.

For example, you may send out surveys after a customer makes a purchase or interacts with your support line. You might survey clients for feedback on a new product or service. Engaging with customers through surveys can help you get an idea of your business strengths and areas where you can improve.

Creating customer journey maps is another way to measure CX. If you’re nosey like me, customer journey maps can help you figure out how your customers are feeling and why they respond to your business in the way that they do.

This process tracks a customer‘s interactions and can help you pinpoint why a customer doesn’t follow through on a sale or chooses one product over a different one you offer.

For example, you might notice a customer finds you through a social media ad, goes to your website and fills their shopping cart, then doesn’t end up making a purchase. A journey map helps you visualize the customer experience and find points of friction based on customer actions and emotions.

Although 20% of service professionals who responded to HubSpot’s State of Service survey say that measuring the impact of their team’s efforts is challenging, there are plenty of metrics you can use for customer experience tracking. You can (and should!) use a variety of CX metrics together for the most complete picture of the customer’s journey with your brand.

Customer Experience Metrics

As highlighted above, let’s discuss eight key metrics in more detail. Plus, I chatted with a few experts who graciously shared how they use these metrics to effectively improve their customers’ experience. (It’s okay to steal their ideas!) This should help you get a better idea of how to use these metrics in your own business.

1. Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT)

31% of service professionals who responded to HubSpot’s State of Service survey said one of their goals is to increase their customer satisfaction score. Personally, I’ve found that the Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT) is one of the most straightforward ways of measuring your customer experience.

While typically used as a customer service metric, CSAT can also give you an idea of the customer experience, considering support interactions are one major component of CX. This is a simple survey that gauges how satisfied a client is following an interaction with your business.

I’m sure you’ve seen CSAT in action. Think of those surveys at the end of customer service calls.

For example, after a customer talks to a live representative via online chat, they can rank the support agent’s response based on how satisfied or helpful the solutions are. Or, after a client purchases a product or service, you can ask how satisfied they are with that product or service.

Calculating CSAT

To calculate CSAT, all you need to do is send a survey immediately following a purchase or interaction. This survey will ask how satisfied a customer is with their experience on a corresponding scale. The CSAT is the average score of that survey.

Featured Resource: Customer Survey Templates

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Pro Tip: Edita Vaskeviciute, Director of Customer Support at Omnisend, says her team relies on the CSAT.

“We use the Customer Satisfaction Score (CSAT) to measure the satisfaction level of customers after contacting our customer support team regarding inquiries or issues with the Omnisend product,” Vaskeviciute says. 

This enables her team to identify areas for improvement, track customer sentiment over time, and make data-driven decisions to enhance the overall customer experience.

“The best tip is to listen to your customers, consistently analyze the feedback they provide, and use it to improve your products, services, and support processes,” Vaskeviciute notes

2. Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Net Promoter Score (NPS) is one of the main methods to measure customer experience. Your NPS will let you know the percentage of customers that love, are neutral, or aren’t a fan of your brand. I understand that it might sting to learn that some customers aren’t a fan of your brand, but this information is vital so that you can make crucial changes to improve the customer experience.

Calculating NPS

To calculate NPS, you’ll send a survey to your customers with an NPS question asking them how likely they are to recommend you to a friend, on a scale of 0-10. Scores 0-6 are detractors, scores 7-8 are passives, and scores 9-10 are promoters.

Your NPS is the percentage of detractor responses subtracted from promoter responses.

With this score, you can instantly tell how many customers are happy enough with their customer experience that they’ve become ambassadors for your brand.

Featured Resource: Net Promoter Score Calculator

net promoter score calculator

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Pro Tip: Paige Arnof-Fenn, Founder & CEO at Mavens & Moguls, says that although the net promoter score isn’t a perfect indicator of the customer experience, it’s still a beneficial metric.

According to Arnof-Fenn, NPS is a simple way to get a quick read on consumer sentiment, allowing it to be widely embraced and implemented to make sure their customers are happy. And even though NPS is not a perfect tool, it’s still valuable to companies where most business comes from word of mouth.

“Customer satisfaction and NPS matter because repeat customers and referrals are key, the most cost-efficient way to build a business and scale your brand in my experience. Would they recommend it to others? This is important to understand for insights into why your brand matters,” Arnof-Fenn says.

3. Customer Effort Score (CES)

If your customers are anything like me, they want simple interactions. Your website should be easy to navigate. Your products should be easy to assemble and use. And your customer service team should be easy to connect with for the client.

You can use a Customer Effort Score (CES) survey to allow customers to rank an interaction with a company or its products and services as easy, neutral, or difficult.

Calculating CES

To calculate CES, you take the sum of your customer effort ratings and divide it by the total number of survey responses you received.

If customers are ranking a product difficult to use, you want to innovate ways to make it more user-friendly. Like if it‘s hard to find the menu on your website, you’ll need to redesign the site or install a simpler template to improve the CX.

Pro Tip: Will Yang, Head of Growth and Marketing of Instrumentl, says his team keeps track of the customer effort score to measure their customer’s effort levels when it comes to interacting with the company.

“The customer effort score (CES) helps us measure how easy it is for customers to deal with our company. High customer effort leads to dissatisfaction and affects loyalty. The use of CES in identifying the pain points along our customer journey aids in streamlining our processes and making interactions more effortless. This analysis often results in simplified user interfaces and fewer steps involved in critical processes.” Yangl says,

4. Customer Lifetime Value (CLV)

Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) tells you how much one customer has brought to a business in the entire relationship. In other words, how much they’re “worth” to a business. The calculation also takes into account how much a business is spending to keep that customer.

It’s a good customer experience metric because you can see over time whether a customer is satisfied and making more purchases or if they spend less with your business.

Calculating CLV

To calculate CLV, you multiply the customer value times the average customer lifespan.

Typically, the better the CX, the higher the CLV. But if you start to see the customer spend less over time, you can determine why and create solutions to raise the CLV.

Pro Tip: Tom Golubovich, Head of Marketing at Ninja Transfers, says the customer lifetime value is an important metric for his customer experience team.

Golubovich says, “Customer lifetime value is important to us as we were one of the first companies to bring DTF Transfers to market. We want to ensure that our customers remain loyal and continue to come back time and time again.”

Golubovich notes that his team looks at customer reorders by account and the customers who have signed up for the “Ninja Rewards” program. “Ninja Rewards” is a loyalty program that allows customers to 5x points on every order while accessing promotional rewards. 

“We identified who were the most valuable customers to our business not just by looking at the customer lifetime value of existing orders and making projections but by sending out a survey and having customers self-identify … how much they were looking to spend on DTF transfers within the next 12 months,” Golubovich says. 

According to Golubovich, this allows his team to pivot our marketing strategies to focus on this more lucrative demographic.

5. Customer Churn Rate

Churn rate is the percentage of your customers or subscribers who cancel or don’t renew their subscriptions during a given time period.

20% of service professionals find it challenging to prevent customer churn. While churn is inevitable, it’s still important that you learn why churn is happening in your company so you can reduce it as much as possible.

Calculating Churn Rate

To calculate your churn rate, designate a time period and tally up the total number of customers you’ve acquired and the number of customers who churned during that time period.

Then, divide the number of customers who churned by the total number of customers acquired, and multiply that decimal by 100% to calculate your churn rate.

This metric should help you nail down why customers are leaving. Is it because of a lack of engagement? A poor user experience? Or perhaps it’s a lack of support? Either way, measuring and analyzing your churn rate will help you figure out how to reduce it.

Pro Tip: Derek Bruce, Operations Director at First Aid at Work Course, understands how useful the customer churn rate is to any business.

“A recent report suggested that a 5% drop in churn can increase profit by 125%, so this is an important area for improvement,” Bruce says. “A high churn rate soon after initial training might indicate an absence of value in the post-training support, so we introduced follow-up webinars and refresher courses, reducing our churn by 4.8% within 12 months.”

In the early years, Bruce says his team focused on the acquisition of new customers as opposed to the retention of old customers, which led to a temporary increase in churn.

“An important learning was that retention of customers is as important, if not more so, than continually acquiring new ones,” he says.

6. Customer Retention Rate

Customer retention rate is essentially the opposite of the churn rate, and 31% of service professionals say increasing customer retention is an important goal of theirs. This CX metric measures how many customers a business retains over a set period of time and helps determine customer loyalty.

Retention rate is slightly more challenging to calculate, though, because you will need to take into account the customers you retained, the customers you lost, and the customers you gained in a set period of time.

Calculating Retention Rate

To calculate retention rate:

  • Set the time period, which could be a week, a month, a year, etc.
  • Start with the number of customers you have at the end of that set time period.
  • Subtract new customers gained during the set time period.
  • Divide the resulting number by the number of clients you had at the beginning of the time period.
  • Multiply the result by 100 to get a percentage.

Ideally, you want a high retention rate while also bringing in new clients that later become loyal customers. If you have a low retention rate but high sales, you’ll want to determine why customers are making one or few purchases and then leaving your business.

Pro Tip: Joel Wolfe, President of HiredSupport, keeps a regular check on their customer retention rate. This helps his team understand the degree of satisfaction that customers drive from HiredSupport’s products. 

“It’s a great way to understand what needs to be improved and what’s causing low retention rates. A great way to measure this metric is choosing a specific time period for analysis. It can be monthly, quarterly, or even annually, depending on the business cycle,” Wolfe says.

7. Customer Journey Analytics

Another technique to measure the customer experience is to use your analytics to look at the customer journey. 23% of service professionals have made it their goal to better understand the customer journey for a better customer experience.

Your customer journey map can answer questions about customer motivations, needs, and pain points. It‘ll also help you understand all the touch points a customer experiences on their journey. And this is how you’ll gather your customer journey analytics.

Analyzing the Customer Journey

To analyze the customer journey, you’ll probably want to start by pulling data from your social media, ads, website, company events, product reviews, onboarding, customer loyalty programs, emails, and surveys. Then, you can create a page or tab on your customer journey map dedicated to reporting the metrics of your touch points, so you can evaluate your customer experience.

Featured Resource: Customer Journey Map Templates

customer journey templateDownload for Free

Pro Tip: Most of the experts I chatted with had quite a bit to say about customer journey analytics, so that tells me this is one of the most important metrics you can gather.

Bruce says when his team collects customer journey analytics, they start by examining every touchpoint a customer has had with the brand, from the very first visit to the website to online course registration — all the way through to course completion and beyond. 

“It’s about really looking at how the customer is engaging with us. We must understand their journey so we can see where we can improve it,” Bruce says. 

For example, Bruce recently saw that, during the registration process for one online course, there was a very high drop-off rate. So, his team incorporated suggestions from their analytics and introduced a simplified registration form, as well as clear instructions on how to fill it in. This resulted in a 2.5% increase in course registrations. 

“We also once launched a marketing campaign promoting advanced first-aid training. The messaging of this campaign was not a good fit for our customer base, despite it being a very relevant course for our existing audience,” Bruce says.

Bruce notes that they had a lot of people signing up for the course because it was a hot topic, only to see a dip in the satisfaction scores afterward. Bruce notes that the messaging for the campaign resonated poorly with those who signed up. 

“Now, we have learned to tailor our communication strategies towards specific customer segments depending on their needs during different stages of their journey,” he says.

8. Customer Support Ticket Trends

48% of service professionals found that the number of customer service requests they received in 2023 increased. You can take a look at your customer support tickets to pinpoint trends impacting the customer experience.

Are there recurring issues that cause pain for your customers? If so, try to improve them as they come up. You might decide you need to create clearer instructions, explainer videos, or product tweaks because of the trends you identified.

Analyzing Customer Support Ticket Trends

Key customer support ticket metrics and trends to analyze are first response time, average handle time, and first call resolution. These analytics can help you improve the customer experience from a customer support perspective.

Pro Tip: Smitha Baliga, CEO/CFO of TeleDirect Communications, says looking at their customer support ticket trends is a great way to identify areas of need.

Baliga says, “[Customer support trend tickets] are reviewed to gain insights into ticket volumes, common issues, handle times, and resolution rates. This analysis helps us identify areas where we may need to provide more self-help resources, enhance our products, or provide additional training to deliver faster and more effective support.”

How to Accurately Measure Customer Experience

CX metrics are the key to effectively measuring the customer experience. You can use a combination of surveys, retention and churn rates, and customer trend data to determine how satisfied your customers are at every step of the journey — and whether or not they’re willing to come back or refer your brand to others.

Start customer experience tracking so you can make the business improvements necessary to retain more clients and generate more revenue.

Editor’s note: This article was originally published in October 2022 and has since been updated for comprehensiveness.

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A few years ago, I checked into a flight the night before a trip and noticed a baggage charge. Surprised, since my rewards credit card usually covered this, I jumped to Google for an explanation. Like 81% of customers who try to solve issues themselves first, I scoured the airline’s FAQs and Reddit, but found no answers. Instead of packing, I spent my time searching until I finally found a 1-800 customer support number.

Taking a deep breath, I dialed. Navigating endless menus, enduring repetitive hold music, and repeating my issue to multiple agents, I grew increasingly frustrated. Then, I got disconnected and had to start over. It was a nightmare, leaving me thinking, “There has to be a better way.”

And there was.

AI customer service software, a solution that understands and values your time, was the answer to my customer service woes. AI customer service software has revolutionized how businesses interact with customers.

→ Access Now: 50 Customer Service Email Templates [Free Resource]

In this piece, we‘ll explore how AI reshapes customer service with top-tier software that promises efficiency, personalization, and satisfaction. Based on thorough research and hands-on demos, I’ll provide honest reviews to help you understand these tools and choose the best fit for your needs. Let‘s dive into how AI isn’t just changing the game — it’s redefining it.

Table of Contents:

What Is AI Customer Service Software?

Imagine a world where customer service is swift, efficient, and available 24/7. Sounds like a dream. That’s the promise of an AI customer service platform. But what exactly is it?

AI customer service software leverages artificial intelligence to streamline and enhance how businesses interact with customers. For instance, imagine a customer contacting a company’s support team with a complex issue. The AI system, using machine learning, natural language processing, and data analytics, quickly understands the problem and provides a personalized solution. This starkly contrasts the traditional method, where the customer had to wait for a human agent to understand the issue and then offer a solution.

From chatbots handling routine questions to AI-driven analytics predicting customer needs, this tech is transforming the customer experience. HubSpot’s State of AI Survey shows that 71% of customer support specialists agree that AI/automation tools can help improve customers’ overall experience with their company.

AI customer service software is designed to enhance the customer experience. It aims to reduce wait times, provide accurate information, and personalize interactions. With AI-powered chatbots or virtual assistants, customers can get immediate responses instead of being put on hold. These intelligent tools can handle everything from answering FAQs to troubleshooting issues, freeing up human agents to tackle more complex problems.

An AI customer service platform isn‘t just about automating tasks — it’s about creating a seamless, satisfying customer journey. Let’s delve deeper into how it works and explore some of the top solutions available in the market today.

reasons to use ai customer service software

Why Use AI Customer Service Software?

Improved Response Time

One of the most significant benefits of AI customer service software is the drastic reduction in response time. I’ve seen firsthand how AI-powered chatbots can handle multiple inquiries simultaneously, providing instant responses that keep customers satisfied.

According to HubSpot’s research from the State of Service 2024 report, 80% of customers expect their service tickets and requests to be resolved immediately. This expectation is well-met with AI, as 46% of service professionals using AI customer service platforms report significantly improved response times, and another 46% report somewhat improved response times. AI ensures your business can meet these expectations, significantly improving overall customer satisfaction.

24/7 Availability

AI doesn’t need to sleep. One of the game-changing aspects of AI customer service software is its ability to provide support around the clock. We’ve all experienced how frustrating it can be to need help outside of regular business hours and not get it. AI eliminates this problem by offering 24/7 support, ensuring customers can get assistance whenever needed, which is especially helpful for businesses with a global customer base.

According to Salesforce’s State of the Connected Customer report, 77% of customers expect to interact with someone immediately when they contact a company. An AI customer service platform meets this demand, ensuring that every customer query is answered, regardless of the time of day.

Enhanced Personalization

I’ve always valued customer service that feels personal, and AI customer service software takes this to the next level. AI systems can help by analyzing customer data to provide customized responses and recommendations, significantly enhancing the customer experience. I’ve seen how AI can remember past conversations and preferences from my interactions, making every exchange feel unique and customized.

According to Zendesk, 59% of customers think businesses should personalize their experiences based on the data they’re collecting on them. And according to HubSpot data from the State of Service 2024 report, 78% of customer service professionals say customers expect more personalization than ever before.

By utilizing AI, businesses can provide a more personalized and engaging experience for their customers, ensuring they feel understood and valued every step of the

Increased Efficiency

Efficiency is another major advantage I’ve observed with AI customer service software.

AI is great at handling routine tasks, which means human agents can concentrate on more complex issues that need a personal touch. This not only speeds up the resolution process but also reduces operational costs.

HubSpot’s findings indicate that businesses using AI for customer service can handle a higher volume of queries without compromising quality, improving overall efficiency. According to the State of AI Survey by Hubspot, 78% of customer support specialists agree that AI/automation tools can help them be more efficient.

Data-Driven Insights

Finally, AI customer service software provides invaluable data-driven insights by analyzing customer interactions to identify common issues and trends. These insights inform business strategies and decision-making. For example, businesses can track customer sentiment, common issues, and agent performance with HubSpot’s AI features.

According to HubSpot’s State of AI Survey, 42% of customer service pros using AI tools to collect and analyze feedback report significant improvements in customer experience. This capability allows businesses to proactively address problems and enhance their services.

Pro tip: Some AI platforms highlight unresolved customer questions, helping identify content gaps that need addressing.

By incorporating AI into your customer service strategy, you can harness these benefits to improve the customer experience, increase efficiency, and foster greater satisfaction and loyalty. Tools such as HubSpot’s AI-powered Service Hub offer extensive features to help businesses efficiently manage customer interactions.

Having explored the benefits of AI in customer service, let’s dive into the top AI customer service software solutions available today. These tools are designed to optimize your customer service operations and deliver exceptional experiences. Based on my research and hands-on demos, here are my top picks:

1. HubSpot Service Hub

If you’re wondering how AI can help small businesses, look no further. As a small business owner, I find HubSpot’s Service Hub incredibly user-friendly. Its integration with other HubSpot tools makes it seamless to manage customer interactions across different channels. The automated ticketing system ensures no customer query is overlooked, and the live chat feature is responsive and intuitive. HubSpot’s data shows that customer service pros who use their chatbot to automatically respond to requests can save about two hours and 20 minutes each day on average.

The knowledge base feature enables businesses to generate comprehensive articles and FAQs, effectively reducing repetitive queries. Customer service professionals who use HubSpot AI to write responses to customer service requests save an average of one hour and 50 minutes per day. Overall, HubSpot’s analytics provide deep insights into customer interactions, helping businesses continuously improve service quality.

Screenshot of HubSpot AI chatflow options in Service Hub

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What I like: HubSpot’s Service Hub stands out for its comprehensive features, including automated ticketing, live chat, and a robust knowledge base.

Best for: Small to medium businesses looking for an all-in-one solution.

Pro tip: Utilize the built-in reporting tools to gain insights into customer satisfaction and agent performance.

Demo: Watch a demo of HubSpot’s Service Hub.

2. Fin

Intercom’s Fin AI is a comprehensive AI customer service platform featuring an AI Agent for customer interactions, an AI Copilot to assist agents, and an AI Analyst for leadership insights. I’ve found its intuitive design and customization options particularly beneficial for managing complex interactions.

The AI Agent handles customer inquiries efficiently, while the AI Copilot supports agents by suggesting responses and next steps. The AI Analyst provides detailed analytics, enabling businesses to continually optimize their customer service strategies.

Screenshot of FIN AI agent and chat screen for customer service

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Best for: Intercom’s Fin AI is best suited for tech-savvy businesses that want advanced features and customization in their customer service operations. It’s particularly effective for companies that handle a high volume of complex customer interactions and need a robust solution to manage and streamline their support processes.

Fin AI‘s ability to integrate seamlessly with the Intercom platform makes it ideal for businesses already using Intercom’s suite of tools.

What I like: Intercom’s AI chatbots are highly intuitive and can handle complex customer interactions efficiently.

Pro tip: Use Intercom’s A/B testing capabilities to optimize chatbot interactions.

Demo: Watch a demo of Intercom’s Fin

3. Zendesk AI

Zendesk AI is a versatile platform with various AI-driven features such as the Answer Bot, AI-powered knowledge management, and predictive analytics.

The Answer Bot uses machine learning to respond instantly to customer inquiries, reducing the workload on human agents and ensuring quick resolutions. Additionally, Zendesk’s AI can analyze customer interactions to identify trends and common issues, providing valuable insights that can inform strategic decisions.

The platform’s predictive analytics capabilities help businesses anticipate customer needs and proactively address potential problems, enhancing overall customer satisfaction.

Screenshot of Zendesk’s AI customer service software

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What I like: Zendesk AI offers a comprehensive suite of AI-powered tools designed to enhance customer service efficiency and effectiveness.

Best for: Businesses of all sizes looking for a robust AI-driven customer service platform.

Pro tip: Leverage Zendesk AI’s predictive analytics and machine learning capabilities to predict customer needs and enhance service delivery.

Demo: Explore the interactive demo here.

4. Salesforce Einstein

Salesforce Einstein is a powerhouse for AI-driven customer service. Its seamless integration with Salesforce CRM allows for a unified view of customer interactions, which I’ve found incredibly valuable for maintaining consistency across channels.

Einstein’s predictive analytics are particularly impressive, helping businesses anticipate customer needs and address potential issues ahead of time. This approach can improve customer satisfaction and reduce the workload on support teams. The automation features streamline many routine tasks, freeing up agents to focus on more complex issues.

Salesforce Einstein is an invaluable asset for large enterprises with complex customer service needs.

Screenshot of Salesforce Einstein AI customer service software interface

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What I like: Salesforce Einstein integrates seamlessly with Salesforce CRM, offering powerful AI-driven insights and automation.

Best for: Large enterprises using Salesforce CRM.

Pro tip: Utilize Einstein’s predictive analytics to proactively address customer needs.

Demo: Watch the Salesforce Einstein demo.

5. Ada

Ada’s simplicity and quick deployment are standout features. The demos show that within a short time, businesses can have a fully functional AI chatbot capable of handling a variety of customer inquiries. I like the ease of customization, which allows companies to tailor the chatbot to address their most common customer questions effectively.

Despite its simplicity, Ada’s performance is robust, consistently providing accurate and helpful responses. This makes it an ideal solution for startups, where quick implementation and immediate results are crucial. Ada proves to be an efficient and reliable tool for enhancing customer service operations.

Screenshot of Ada AI customer service interface and chat

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What I like: Ada is known for its ease of use and quick deployment, making it perfect for businesses looking to start using AI customer service quickly.

Best for: Startups and smaller teams.

Pro tip: Customize Ada’s chatbot with your FAQs to maximize its effectiveness right from the start

Demo: Sign up to get a demo here.

6. Freshdesk AI

Freshdesk AI, the omni-channel customer support platform powered by Freddy AI, is designed to make customer support smarter and more efficient.

Freddy AI learns from past interactions to suggest relevant responses, speeding up resolution times and providing a better customer experience. It works across various messaging platforms like WhatsApp and Facebook, so customers can get help where they prefer. Freddy also gives agents a unified view of interactions, making it easier to respond effectively. Plus, its analytics help identify and address common issues.

The analytics provided by Freddy AI offer insights into common customer pain points, helping businesses refine their support strategy. Overall, Freshdesk AI offers a robust and cost-effective solution for those on a budget.

Freshdesk AI customer service ticketing interface

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What I like: Freshdesk AI offers powerful automation features like Freddy AI, which can handle a wide range of customer queries.

Best for: Companies needing robust automation at an affordable price.

Pro tip: Leverage Freddy AI’s analytics to identify and address common customer pain points.

Demo: Request a Freshdesk demo here.

Transforming Customer Service With AI: Key Takeaways

Exploring AI customer service software has shown me just how transformative these tools can be. AI dramatically improves response times and ensures 24/7 availability, which is crucial for meeting modern customer expectations. The ability to personalize interactions and gain deep insights into customer behavior is particularly impressive.

Among the top tools, HubSpot’s Service Hub stands out as my favorite. Its user-friendly interface, seamless integration with other HubSpot tools, and comprehensive features make it an excellent choice for small to medium businesses. The AI-powered analytics and automation capabilities significantly enhance service quality and efficiency.

Another standout is Intercom’s Fin AI, which excels in handling complex customer interactions with intuitive design and customization options. Its advanced features, like A/B testing and detailed analytics, allow businesses to continually optimize their customer service strategies.

Adopting AI in customer service isn‘t just about keeping up with technology trends — it’s about fundamentally transforming how you interact with and support your customers. These tools offer remarkable opportunities to improve efficiency, personalize experiences, and proactively address customer needs, setting a new standard for exceptional customer service.

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Ever experienced a tech problem that restarting your device just doesn’t fix? We’ve all been there. If you love fast resolutions like I do, you’ll do a quick Google search related to your problem. As long as the device manufacturer has done its job right, you’ll find a solution within seconds — on the company’s knowledge base.

Over the years, I’ve visited hundreds of knowledge bases, and I’ve helped design and write plenty, too. So what have I got to show for it? More product information and the ability to tell good knowledge bases from bad.

If you’re curious about knowledge bases, stick around. I’ll explain what they are and why you need them. Then, I’ll share the best help desk knowledge base examples to show you what an excellent knowledge base should look like. Let’s dive in.

→ Access Now: 5 Free Customer Support Templates

Table of Contents


What is a Knowledge Base?

A knowledge base is a hub for information related to a company’s product or service. There are no clear-cut rules for the type of content a knowledge base must contain. What’s more, it’s often called help, support, or documentation.

Regardless of what a knowledge base is called, here’s what you can expect to see:

  • Frequently asked questions (FAQs).
  • Informative articles about a business (e.g., blogs).
  • Troubleshooting guides (e.g., how to fix a Microsoft Word error code).
  • Step-by-step guides (e.g., how to change my password).
  • Complete user manuals for products or services (e.g., iPhone user manual).

These examples are relevant to customer-facing knowledge bases, but you can also have internal knowledge bases for your employees. For example, your company could have a knowledge base that covers onboarding, work policies, standard operating procedures (SOPs), and guides for using software or machines.

Most companies you interact with online will have some type of knowledge base, which they may have built using knowledge base software. Before I share some stunning help desk knowledge base examples, let’s look at why they’re important to businesses today.

Why Your Company Needs a Knowledge Base

Whenever I have an issue with a company’s product or service, I almost always head to their knowledge base for solutions. In most cases, I don’t even have to contact customer support at all.

Most customers are like me. We prefer finding solutions ourselves. It saves us the time we’d otherwise spend submitting tickets in hopes of getting a quick resolution. With an effective knowledge base, you can meet customers’ needs without wasting too much of their time and your support team’s time.

When I spoke to Amanda Gulley, chief of product and user experience for EdPlus at Arizona State University, she agreed that a knowledge base is no one-trick pony. She said, “An intuitive knowledge base is not just a tool for information dissemination; it’s a strategic asset that significantly enhances customer satisfaction and organizational efficiency.”

Not convinced you need one yet? Here are the key benefits of creating a knowledge base:

Around-the-Clock Support

While your support team sleeps, your knowledge base can help customers fix their problems and learn more about your products. Think of your knowledge base as an extension of your customer support team that’s available 24/7.

Quick Resolutions

I like a fast solution to my tech problems, and most of the time, I don’t really mind if it comes from an explainer video, a how-to article, or a support representative. Sure, it’s nice to chat with a real human, but it’s also great to have a problem fixed without a support ticket.

Boosting SEO

A well-structured and expertly written knowledge base is a great marketing asset. If you provide high-quality information that benefits customers and general audiences, Google could reward your knowledge base content with high rankings.

More Time for Support Teams to Focus on Complex Issues

While your knowledge base helps users solve simple problems, your support team can devote time to urgent, high-impact issues. Don’t forget that your support team can also link customers to knowledge base articles, saving even more time and resources.

Gain Powerful Insights

If your knowledge base software provides reporting and analytics features, you can discover valuable information about customer trends and pain points. Plus, you can spot areas of your products or services that confuse new customers.

1. HubSpot

Since you’re on the HubSpot website ( … great to have you here!), is it safe for me to assume you know a bit about what HubSpot does?

Here’s the gist if you arrived through a Google search: HubSpot is a customer relationship management (CRM) platform, meaning it provides a suite of tools that helps businesses grow while prioritizing their customers. Whatever tool or hub (e.g., marketing, sales, or operations) you’re interested in, HubSpot Knowledge Base is a great place to learn about it.

You’ll find plenty of images to help you navigate through your chosen tool. And then, there’s HubBot, the friendly AI chatbot on the right side of every page, eager to answer your “how-to” questions.

HubSpot Knowledge Base offers various information sources, including Help Center and Documentation.

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What I like: HubSpot Knowledge Base makes it super easy to find any information I need. I love exploring the handy search bar, the quick list of all product/service categories, and even the glossary. But most times, I simply hop on a chat with HubBot to get answers faster.

HubSpot Glossary defines common terms used in HubSpot tools.

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2. Slack

Slack is a workplace messaging app that’s used by 77 of Fortune 100 companies. I’m no stranger to Slack’s iconic messaging sound and its stunning brand colors — I’ve used it to communicate with teams in different companies. But how does its knowledge base stack up?

Slack Help Center provides all the information you need to understand the app.

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Slack’s knowledge base displays a prominent search bar as well as direct links to common troubleshooting topics. It also has shortcuts that help users save time — I just found out that pressing the “Up” key lets me edit my previous message.

What I like: I find Slack pretty intuitive, so I don’t use the knowledge base very often. That said, I think the short YouTube explainer videos in some sections of the knowledge base are great for explaining Slack to new team members.

3. Confluence

As a collaboration and knowledge sharing tool for companies, you’d imagine that Confluence’s knowledge base would be a sight to behold. Spoiler alert: it is.

Confluence Resource Center offers product guides, demos, and more.

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If you’re thinking of using Confluence to create your own knowledge base, visiting this Resource Center is a must. You’ll see what a great example looks like, and you’ll learn the steps and best practices for knowledge base setup.

Beyond the clear and helpful main page, you’ll find well-structured documents containing all the information you need, alongside high-quality images and GIFs.

What I like: I think Confluence’s knowledge base is a great example of how marketing efforts can slot into an information site. Alongside easy-to-access demo videos and product guides, Confluence adds customer success stories to reel you in.

4. Apple

When something goes wrong with my iPhone, I usually head straight to Apple’s knowledge base, which links to great YouTube video tutorials with subtitles for enhanced accessibility. And, if I can’t find what I’m looking for, the knowledge base conveniently directs me to human support.

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What I like: Apple displays all its products in its self-service knowledge base, letting users choose the products they’re interested in. I love how this filtering mechanism ensures I only see relevant content when I select “iPhone.”

5. Amplitude

Amplitude aims to make digital analytics accessible to every business, and to achieve this, it needs a solid knowledge base for users to turn to.

Apple Support showing various Apple devices and how to solve common issues.

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Amplitude’s help desk knowledge base has a user-friendly layout that’s easy to navigate, providing a great customer experience. If you’re new to this platform, the “Start Here” section is the ultimate guide to get you up and running.

What I like: Amplitude categorizes common questions under five main sections, which makes it easy for me to find the solutions I need.

6. Airbnb

Love it or hate it, Airbnb is a huge player in the tourism industry, and the company has made it super easy to book vacation rentals. With its knowledge base, you can find answers to common questions, whether you’re a long-term guest or looking to start an Airbnb.

Airbnb’s knowledge base helps with reservations, accounts, and more.

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I played around the knowledge base and found that the most popular topics appeared as suggestions when I clicked the search bar. Impressively, these lists differ depending on whether you’re a guest, host, experience host, or travel admin.

What I like: Airbnb prominently displays in-depth content related to anti-discrimination and accessibility policies, tips for avoiding scams, and advice on what to do in an emergency.

7. 1Password

1Password is a top password manager that’s trusted by millions of customers, including 100,000+ businesses. If you’re just getting started, you’ll find everything you need once you hit the “Start Here” button. For more experienced users, the knowledge base offers useful tips on getting the most from 1Password, like using apps, browser extensions, and vaults.

1Password Support is a great help desk knowledge base example.

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What I like: When I navigated to the support hub (i.e., knowledge base), the option to contact support directly was right there in front of me. This was refreshing — some companies seem to bury their contact information to discourage you from getting in touch.

8. Canva

This popular design platform has over 170 million active users. Without a great knowledge base, Canva’s support personnel would be inundated with questions on everything from templates to teams.

Canva’s knowledge base lets you browse by topic.

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For creatives, this is one of the best knowledge base examples out there. I’ve learned a lot from Canva’s Design School tutorials, and the blog is a great resource of relevant information for designers, marketers, and businesses of all sizes.

What I like: Canva’s knowledge base has drop-down menus that provide all the information I need, from designing to sharing my creations. The Design Spotlight section is particularly useful for creating website and social media images.

9. Google

As the world’s top search engine with a market share of 90.91%, Google provides customer self-service options through an extensive knowledge base.

Google’s knowledge base content for Chrome, YouTube, and more.

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Instead of a table of contents, the knowledge base displays a group of icons associated with popular Google products and services (e.g., Chrome, Gmail, and YouTube) for consumers, businesses, and developers.

What I like: The support homepage is on-brand and uncluttered — with a few simple clicks, I can find whatever Google service I need help with.

10. Netflix

Generally, Netflix works well for me, so I rarely have to head to its knowledge base. If my TV binge session is interrupted by technical issues, it’s usually something I can fix with a quick refresh.

When I do need to look up Netflix support, it’s usually due to suspected password sharing or using Netflix on too many devices (I’m innocent, Netflix!).

Netflix’s knowledge base with search bar.

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I noticed that the account and billing section is high up on the knowledge base, which makes sense to me — it’s pretty much the only section I need to read. Once you click a section heading, you’ll find a drop-down list of useful explainer articles.

Personally, I’d like to see snippets of these articles displayed here, but I don’t have any major issues with the bare-bones layout.

What I like: I really appreciate that a section of Netflix’s knowledge base lets me suggest TV shows or movies. It means I can hold out a tiny bit of hope that they’ll take my suggestions on board.

11. OpenAI

Open AI, the company behind ChatGPT, has a good knowledge base that’s mostly dedicated to account information and using ChatGPT. As you might expect, the company uses an AI chatbot as a knowledge base tool.

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When I browsed some knowledge base articles, I was impressed to see that they were recently updated. The knowledge base makes effective use of hyperlinks within articles, which helped me navigate to sections of interest.

What I like: OpenAI’s knowledge base is transparent about the limitations of ChatGPT, including its Western bias and the fact that it can be very convincing while providing incorrect information. I think new users should study ChatGPT’s knowledge base to ensure they’re using the tool effectively.

12. Asana

Asana is a work management platform with features such as workflow automation and project management. Its knowledge base has a clean layout with lots of whitespace, and the chatbot powered by Forethought AI is a nice addition.

Asana’s knowledge base, which is the ultimate guide to this product.

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But, the benefits of this knowledge base extend beyond a minimalist layout and chatbot charms. Asana provides helpful use cases, screenshot-assisted help articles (I love these!), and even courses on the product, including self-paced, pre-recorded, and live training.

What I like: I think the explainer videos in Asana’s knowledge base strike a great balance between funny and informative. Even if you don’t plan on using Asana, check out these videos to see how knowledge bases can have real entertainment value.

13. Dropbox

If you’re among the 700+ million people who use Dropbox, you might have used its knowledge base to find solutions to common issues like syncing, sharing, and organizing your files.

Like many of the best knowledge bases, the search bar is at the top of the page. When you click on it, you’ll get suggestions for top searches, guiding you to the solutions you seek.

Dropbox’s knowledge base provides information on apps and integrations.

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What I like: This knowledge base prominently features the Dropbox Community Forum, which I’m a big fan of. It has specific groups for beginners, photographers, and musicians — shout out to Community Manager Graham for some great posts on music-related topics.

Stay Relevant with Tech Trends

In my examples of help desk knowledge bases, you might have noticed that many companies use AI chatbots to share knowledge — this is no coincidence. Businesses are reworking their knowledge bases in response to technological advancements, making them much easier to manage and navigate.

While I think AI is a great addition to knowledge bases, it’s no substitute for expert-backed content. Ideally, AI should complement rather than replace your support team.

If you’re interested in creating your own knowledge base, check out the examples I’ve provided to see what your competitors are doing. But don’t forget — your customers will ultimately decide if your knowledge base is useful.

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You probably can recall at least a handful of times when you’ve waited on the line to speak to customer service while calling a bank or your internet provider. The longest I’ve waited was 40 minutes — after which my call was automatically dropped. How did that make me feel? Upset, to say the least.

 

Luckily, nowadays calling isn’t your only option to get in touch with brands. Most businesses offer a digital customer experience and offer multiple communication channels to choose from (thank you, technology!).

Without a doubt, online customer service will only continue to grow in importance — and AI will pave the way.

Benefits of Digital Customer Service

1. Boosting Service Quality by Analyzing Feedback

Interacting with clients through a digital channel has one major advantage over face-to-face contact, i.e., you automatically retain a record of your communication.

Now, consider a period like last year. Think of all the chatbot interactions that took place during this time, all the emails you’ve exchanged, or the customer satisfaction surveys you’ve run. This data is a goldmine, which can help paint an accurate picture of your clients.

The great thing is that AI can help you analyze all these vast records for you. It can derive information on the most common customer concerns, or what they say they particularly love — or dislike — about your business. Better yet, you could also set up automatic surveys in the future to continue gathering information.

42% of respondents in HubSpot’s State of Service 2024 report say that they already do this to learn how they can improve their customers’ experiences.

2. Improving Response Time

I can still remember how many hours I’ve spent listening to music while waiting on hold after calling a business. It’s hard to believe that it was the only way to get in touch with many local businesses just a decade ago.

Luckily, this is now a tale of the past — in big part, thanks to AI. To manage customer queries at scale without sacrificing quality, you can set up a chatbot and train it on your FAQs and knowledge base. This lets you automate answers to the most common questions. You’ll only need to engage a customer service member if the topic truly requires human expertise.

If you’re wondering if it pays off to invest in such tools, the short answer is — yes. In our report, 92 percent of specialists say that introducing AI and automation speeds up response times. And half of those respondents described the acceleration as “significant.”

3. Reducing Customer Effort

In my opinion, this benefit deserves special recognition. Let me tell you a story.

Before becoming a marketer, I co-ran an online bookstore that offered a premium service — finding collector’s editions at small stores across the globe and shipping them to the customer.

There was one client who dreamed of a Japanese photo album but knew it was nearly impossible to find it as an individual. He reached out via email and we exchanged a few messages, back and forth, over the course of a few weeks.

He said that he appreciated the opportunity to contact the store online, as he was currently in a completely different timezone and wouldn’t be able to make a phone call. The ability to speak to me asynchronously was the reason why he decided to shop through the bookstore.

This example shows that not all digital customer service interactions must be around instantaneous communication. While a massive advantage in most cases, some clients will appreciate the flexibility that comes with messaging a business and replying at their own pace.

4. Meeting Customer Expectations and Improving Satisfaction

Back in the day, calling customer service was the only option people had. But times have changed drastically, and clients now have plenty of other channels to choose from. They can go with email, live chat, or messaging apps like Facebook.

If brands want to keep their customers satisfied, they must offer multiple communication channels and be available 24/7 — and that’s where self-service comes in.

This is something that a lot of businesses are already aware of. In fact, 64% of companies surveyed by HubSpot say they will increase their investment in self-service options.

5. Establishing Global Reach

Digitizing customer service has another major benefit, and that is offering global reach. Companies can now provide customer support without having a physical office or employing hundreds of people in every market they serve.

Thanks to the use of technology they can effectively answer queries irrespective of where their customers are. What’s more, they can retain the same standard of customer service, which positively reflects on their brand image.

According to HubSpot’s State of Service report, 88% of businesses were able to scale their customer service operations thanks to the use of AI.

Digital Customer Service Examples

Live Chat

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Our report found that 42% of respondents currently use live chat, i.e., an online chat with a human representative on the other side. And out of them, 90% agree that they’re effective in serving customers at the right standard.

What I like: Personally, I don’t like speaking on the phone, so my favorite thing about live chat is that I can get an answer to my query fast, without calling customer service. And my conversation isn’t available to a third party, unlike when I use social media. It’s the perfect option for those who don’t fancy phone interactions but also don’t want to wait long for an email reply.

Chatbot

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In terms of popularity among customer-facing teams, AI chatbots are right up there next to live chat. Our study found that they’re currently used by 37% of global service specialists.

And this number is set to grow. 71% of respondents told us that they plan to grow their investment in this communication channel.

What I like: They’re available round the clock, so customers can try to find answers to their questions without waiting for your support team to come to work the following day. Chatbots have saved me several times. Not that long ago, I had an issue with my website and it turned out I could fix it myself quickly with the help of a helpful AI assistant. Genius!

Knowledge Base

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Having a knowledge base is another important self-service feature, right next to chatbots. It’s a collection of the most important information, such as FAQs, an introduction to your specific services or features, and quick step-by-step instructions. Customers can easily navigate the categories — or chapters — to find the topic they’re interested in.

Perhaps you’re wondering if customers really want to fix issues themselves. Our State of Service report found an answer to this question.

According to the companies we surveyed, 55% of customers say that they actually prefer to self-serve than wait for a real-life agent.

What I like: Investing time in setting up a knowledge base pays off for both sides. Clients can find answers to their questions, while the brand minimizes the number of incoming communication.

Social Media Management

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Currently, over 5 billion people use social media — half of the world’s population. So, it’s hardly surprising that many customers prefer to communicate with brands via Facebook or X, and expect to get their answers quickly. According to our report, 34% of customer service pros use AI to monitor social media for customer service-related issues.

What I like: Social media allows for more personalized communication. Brands can even use a bit of humor at times, which reduces distance and helps to build better relationships with customers. Also, companies can use insights shared by customers to improve the brand experience.

Digital Customer Service Tools

1. HubSpot Service Hub

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Service Hub brings together all your customer service data and channels into one CRM platform, making it easy to support and grow your client base.

You can connect your live chat, emails, chatbot, and customer feedback tools, among others, and bring all customer messages and tickets into a single place. This is also where you and your team manage all ongoing communication. That’s right — no more back-and-forth between channels.

By clicking on a customer’s ticket, you can assign a specific customer service representative to the query. You can also access all the messages, phone calls, and other interactions that have taken place between the customer and your service team so far.

Unsurprisingly, Service Hub also hits the top marks when it comes to AI and automation features. You can create automation rules, such as which types of topics should be assigned to a specific agent or scaled to the customer service team lead.

However, my absolute favorite feature is HubSpot AI, which is a great assistant for customer service teams. One of the things it can help you with is rephrasing your reply.

You can turn a terse turn of phrase into a more conversational, heartfelt, or professional tone of voice. This can be a blessing, particularly if you’re handling a difficult issue or are simply having a bad day but want to ensure you’re empathetic and professional.

What I like: Service Hub covers all the use cases I could possibly think of, drawing on my experience as a customer service team member. I particularly love all the handy sidebars and options, like inserting knowledge base articles, answers to FAQs, or rewriting messages with AI for better impact.

All this happens within the chat text field. Bonus points for allowing customer service to enhance knowledge base articles live, based on their interactions with clients.

2. Ada

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Ada is an AI-powered customer service automation platform, which features a generative AI agent that is able to answer client queries accurately and in real-time.

It’s fast and can come up with relevant responses every single time, thanks to the use of Ada’s Reasoning Engine. It offers personalized responses, learns from previous customer interactions, and can be deployed across multiple digital channels without worrying about losing communication consistency.

What I like: Ada’s ability to understand specific needs and provide answers, which aren’t generic but personalized, is impressive. It makes customers feel valued. It’s always available and ready to assist, so you don’t have to wait in a queue, listening to one tune for 10 minutes (or longer). And the fact that you can deploy it across various channels without compromising response consistency or accuracy is just great.

3. Intercom

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It’s hard to find a customer service pro who hasn’t heard of Intercom. It’s an AI-first customer service solution, which among others features a live chat, chatbots, and targeted messaging capabilities. Their Fin AI Agent provides 24/7 support and is able to resolve 50% of support volume instantly.

What I like: What’s truly amazing about Intercom is that it’s a complete service platform that caters to clients, agents, and leaders alike. Their AI agents answer queries quickly and only pull answers from your support content — so you don’t have to worry about accuracy.

The AI Copilot makes pulling answers really easy, and you can even change the tone of voice to make it sound more like you. And it’s got access to all the questions and answers that have been generated in the past so you can get a more accurate response. When you want to raise a ticket, their AI automatically describes the issue, which is a real-time saver.

4. Help Scout

digital customer service; Help Scout is an example of a digital customer service platform

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Help Scout lets you bring all your client communication into one platform and keep a handy record of previous conversations. Among others, you can add tags and internal notes to client messages to make it easier to handle communication now and in the future.

This communication platform also lets you set automation rules that will accelerate the time to resolution. For example, if a customer asks a question about international shipping, you’re able to automatically draw relevant information from your FAQs.

I also appreciate the fact that the platform is keeping up with the times and uses AI to help the support team. Among others, you can ask AI to read a long email, or even an entire thread, and condense it into a high-level summary.

It can also adjust your tone of voice or message length.

What I like: One feature that caught my eye is ‘real-time collision detection.’ It shows you if someone else is also replying to a request or viewing it, preventing you from sending two responses. This could happen if you handle tens or hundreds of messages every day.

Digital Customer Service — Multichannel is The Way to Go

Each customer has their own preference — I, personally, really dislike calling brands. Whenever possible, I go for email or chat, but I can’t say the same of my parents. They’ll always choose to speak to a brand over the phone. It’s how they’ve been getting answers to questions for decades.

Less-tech-savvy clients will tend to choose face-to-face and calls, but Millenials and Gen-Z will prefer getting things done on screen.

What I recommend is choosing an omnichannel communication approach, so that you can resolve issues for everyone, faster and more efficiently.

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You probably can recall at least a handful of times when you’ve waited on the line to speak to customer service while calling a bank or your internet provider. The longest I’ve waited was 40 minutes — after which my call was automatically dropped. How did that make me feel? Upset, to say the least.

 

Luckily, nowadays calling isn’t your only option to get in touch with brands. Most businesses offer a digital customer experience and offer multiple communication channels to choose from (thank you, technology!).

Without a doubt, online customer service will only continue to grow in importance — and AI will pave the way.

Benefits of Digital Customer Service

1. Boosting Service Quality by Analyzing Feedback

Interacting with clients through a digital channel has one major advantage over face-to-face contact, i.e., you automatically retain a record of your communication.

Now, consider a period like last year. Think of all the chatbot interactions that took place during this time, all the emails you’ve exchanged, or the customer satisfaction surveys you’ve run. This data is a goldmine, which can help paint an accurate picture of your clients.

The great thing is that AI can help you analyze all these vast records for you. It can derive information on the most common customer concerns, or what they say they particularly love — or dislike — about your business. Better yet, you could also set up automatic surveys in the future to continue gathering information.

42% of respondents in HubSpot’s State of Service 2024 report say that they already do this to learn how they can improve their customers’ experiences.

2. Improving Response Time

I can still remember how many hours I’ve spent listening to music while waiting on hold after calling a business. It’s hard to believe that it was the only way to get in touch with many local businesses just a decade ago.

Luckily, this is now a tale of the past — in big part, thanks to AI. To manage customer queries at scale without sacrificing quality, you can set up a chatbot and train it on your FAQs and knowledge base. This lets you automate answers to the most common questions. You’ll only need to engage a customer service member if the topic truly requires human expertise.

If you’re wondering if it pays off to invest in such tools, the short answer is — yes. In our report, 92 percent of specialists say that introducing AI and automation speeds up response times. And half of those respondents described the acceleration as “significant.”

3. Reducing Customer Effort

In my opinion, this benefit deserves special recognition. Let me tell you a story.

Before becoming a marketer, I co-ran an online bookstore that offered a premium service — finding collector’s editions at small stores across the globe and shipping them to the customer.

There was one client who dreamed of a Japanese photo album but knew it was nearly impossible to find it as an individual. He reached out via email and we exchanged a few messages, back and forth, over the course of a few weeks.

He said that he appreciated the opportunity to contact the store online, as he was currently in a completely different timezone and wouldn’t be able to make a phone call. The ability to speak to me asynchronously was the reason why he decided to shop through the bookstore.

This example shows that not all digital customer service interactions must be around instantaneous communication. While a massive advantage in most cases, some clients will appreciate the flexibility that comes with messaging a business and replying at their own pace.

4. Meeting Customer Expectations and Improving Satisfaction

Back in the day, calling customer service was the only option people had. But times have changed drastically, and clients now have plenty of other channels to choose from. They can go with email, live chat, or messaging apps like Facebook.

If brands want to keep their customers satisfied, they must offer multiple communication channels and be available 24/7 — and that’s where self-service comes in.

This is something that a lot of businesses are already aware of. In fact, 64% of companies surveyed by HubSpot say they will increase their investment in self-service options.

5. Establishing Global Reach

Digitizing customer service has another major benefit, and that is offering global reach. Companies can now provide customer support without having a physical office or employing hundreds of people in every market they serve.

Thanks to the use of technology they can effectively answer queries irrespective of where their customers are. What’s more, they can retain the same standard of customer service, which positively reflects on their brand image.

According to HubSpot’s State of Service report, 88% of businesses were able to scale their customer service operations thanks to the use of AI.

Digital Customer Service Examples

Live Chat

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Our report found that 42% of respondents currently use live chat, i.e., an online chat with a human representative on the other side. And out of them, 90% agree that they’re effective in serving customers at the right standard.

What I like: Personally, I don’t like speaking on the phone, so my favorite thing about live chat is that I can get an answer to my query fast, without calling customer service. And my conversation isn’t available to a third party, unlike when I use social media. It’s the perfect option for those who don’t fancy phone interactions but also don’t want to wait long for an email reply.

Chatbot

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In terms of popularity among customer-facing teams, AI chatbots are right up there next to live chat. Our study found that they’re currently used by 37% of global service specialists.

And this number is set to grow. 71% of respondents told us that they plan to grow their investment in this communication channel.

What I like: They’re available round the clock, so customers can try to find answers to their questions without waiting for your support team to come to work the following day. Chatbots have saved me several times. Not that long ago, I had an issue with my website and it turned out I could fix it myself quickly with the help of a helpful AI assistant. Genius!

Knowledge Base

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Having a knowledge base is another important self-service feature, right next to chatbots. It’s a collection of the most important information, such as FAQs, an introduction to your specific services or features, and quick step-by-step instructions. Customers can easily navigate the categories — or chapters — to find the topic they’re interested in.

Perhaps you’re wondering if customers really want to fix issues themselves. Our State of Service report found an answer to this question.

According to the companies we surveyed, 55% of customers say that they actually prefer to self-serve than wait for a real-life agent.

What I like: Investing time in setting up a knowledge base pays off for both sides. Clients can find answers to their questions, while the brand minimizes the number of incoming communication.

Social Media Management

digital customer service, social media management

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Currently, over 5 billion people use social media — half of the world’s population. So, it’s hardly surprising that many customers prefer to communicate with brands via Facebook or X, and expect to get their answers quickly. According to our report, 34% of customer service pros use AI to monitor social media for customer service-related issues.

What I like: Social media allows for more personalized communication. Brands can even use a bit of humor at times, which reduces distance and helps to build better relationships with customers. Also, companies can use insights shared by customers to improve the brand experience.

Digital Customer Service Tools

1. HubSpot Service Hub

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Service Hub brings together all your customer service data and channels into one CRM platform, making it easy to support and grow your client base.

You can connect your live chat, emails, chatbot, and customer feedback tools, among others, and bring all customer messages and tickets into a single place. This is also where you and your team manage all ongoing communication. That’s right — no more back-and-forth between channels.

By clicking on a customer’s ticket, you can assign a specific customer service representative to the query. You can also access all the messages, phone calls, and other interactions that have taken place between the customer and your service team so far.

Unsurprisingly, Service Hub also hits the top marks when it comes to AI and automation features. You can create automation rules, such as which types of topics should be assigned to a specific agent or scaled to the customer service team lead.

However, my absolute favorite feature is HubSpot AI, which is a great assistant for customer service teams. One of the things it can help you with is rephrasing your reply.

You can turn a terse turn of phrase into a more conversational, heartfelt, or professional tone of voice. This can be a blessing, particularly if you’re handling a difficult issue or are simply having a bad day but want to ensure you’re empathetic and professional.

What I like: Service Hub covers all the use cases I could possibly think of, drawing on my experience as a customer service team member. I particularly love all the handy sidebars and options, like inserting knowledge base articles, answers to FAQs, or rewriting messages with AI for better impact.

All this happens within the chat text field. Bonus points for allowing customer service to enhance knowledge base articles live, based on their interactions with clients.

2. Ada

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Ada is an AI-powered customer service automation platform, which features a generative AI agent that is able to answer client queries accurately and in real-time.

It’s fast and can come up with relevant responses every single time, thanks to the use of Ada’s Reasoning Engine. It offers personalized responses, learns from previous customer interactions, and can be deployed across multiple digital channels without worrying about losing communication consistency.

What I like: Ada’s ability to understand specific needs and provide answers, which aren’t generic but personalized, is impressive. It makes customers feel valued. It’s always available and ready to assist, so you don’t have to wait in a queue, listening to one tune for 10 minutes (or longer). And the fact that you can deploy it across various channels without compromising response consistency or accuracy is just great.

3. Intercom

digital customer service tools, intercom

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It’s hard to find a customer service pro who hasn’t heard of Intercom. It’s an AI-first customer service solution, which among others features a live chat, chatbots, and targeted messaging capabilities. Their Fin AI Agent provides 24/7 support and is able to resolve 50% of support volume instantly.

What I like: What’s truly amazing about Intercom is that it’s a complete service platform that caters to clients, agents, and leaders alike. Their AI agents answer queries quickly and only pull answers from your support content — so you don’t have to worry about accuracy.

The AI Copilot makes pulling answers really easy, and you can even change the tone of voice to make it sound more like you. And it’s got access to all the questions and answers that have been generated in the past so you can get a more accurate response. When you want to raise a ticket, their AI automatically describes the issue, which is a real-time saver.

4. Help Scout

digital customer service; Help Scout is an example of a digital customer service platform

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Help Scout lets you bring all your client communication into one platform and keep a handy record of previous conversations. Among others, you can add tags and internal notes to client messages to make it easier to handle communication now and in the future.

This communication platform also lets you set automation rules that will accelerate the time to resolution. For example, if a customer asks a question about international shipping, you’re able to automatically draw relevant information from your FAQs.

I also appreciate the fact that the platform is keeping up with the times and uses AI to help the support team. Among others, you can ask AI to read a long email, or even an entire thread, and condense it into a high-level summary.

It can also adjust your tone of voice or message length.

What I like: One feature that caught my eye is ‘real-time collision detection.’ It shows you if someone else is also replying to a request or viewing it, preventing you from sending two responses. This could happen if you handle tens or hundreds of messages every day.

Digital Customer Service — Multichannel is The Way to Go

Each customer has their own preference — I, personally, really dislike calling brands. Whenever possible, I go for email or chat, but I can’t say the same of my parents. They’ll always choose to speak to a brand over the phone. It’s how they’ve been getting answers to questions for decades.

Less-tech-savvy clients will tend to choose face-to-face and calls, but Millenials and Gen-Z will prefer getting things done on screen.

What I recommend is choosing an omnichannel communication approach, so that you can resolve issues for everyone, faster and more efficiently.

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This Week’s Poll

If you’re still wondering what the answer to this week’s poll is, check back next week for the results. But if you just can’t wait until then, you might be able to find an answer in this blog post.

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